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  • 02.01.2019
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Craftsman wrench dating — Social Media Strategies For Barbers & Stylists

Sears Craftsman wrenches

In an earlier article we reviewed the Early Craftsman Tools of the late s through mid s, and a separate article covered the Craftsman "BE" and H-Circle line of sockets in greater depth. In this page we'll look at the Craftsman "Modern Era" that began around , with a particular emphasis on the manufacturer of the Craftsman "V" series tools. But before revealing the identity of "Maker V", we want to briefly discuss the origin and intent of the modern era tools. By the early s the Craftsman brand was about 15 years old and had become highly successful. The Craftsman line included a full range of mechanics' hand tools by this time, from sockets and drive tools to wrenches and pliers, as well as a broad range of woodworking tools and power tools.

There are, however, small visual clues on most tools that can help to narrow the broader V-series date range. If you want to post your Crafty ratchets on this thread, I'll help you narrow the date ranges where possible and share what knowledge I have of dating these tools. Find More Posts by thesilverone. I refer to this thread all the time, I have it bookmarked. Out of curiosity what are the other forums that are more Craftsman friendly?

I do feel a little out of place here, everyone here is so pro-tool truck and I'm just a home guy. Last edited by kc-steve; at PM. On the hunt for Yes, another hearty thank you for all of your work. I'm interested in researching all of my vintage tool finds and this invaluable. Again, thanks! This is one of those small details I was telling you about. Let me know and then we can get down to business on all your V-series ratchets.

Craftsman Tools:

V-series Boxhead ratchet: Based on catalog evidence, these ratchets were offered by Sears between and and are clearly the product of Moore Drop Forge. There were some subtle cosmetic changes to the handle depressed area between the raised panel and the head but we haven't been able to date these changes.

So, the best we can do is date your boxhead ratchet to - V-series Long Lever Teardrop ratchets 2 : These two ratchets are both from the same period, -and were made by Easco.

The keys to dating these ratchets are the disappearance of the oil port in and the disappearance of the V-series code inperhaps a little later as NOS. The keys to dating this ratchet are the appearance of the VV-series code and the disappearance of the oil port Since your ratchet has an oil port, it can be no later than VM-series late style with figure 8 cover plate Tear Drop ratchet: This newer style of teardrop ratchet was first introduced about and is still sold today This style of teardrop ratchet was made by Danaher.

The key to dating your ratchet is the VM-series code. VM is a "ratchet only" series code and we have only one date observation for this series code.

So, the best we can do is date your ratchet to based on our limited data. Lastly, I'm unaware of any connection between Chrome Vanadiam marked tools and V-series tools.

I'm not saying that there is no connection, just saying we have no persuasive evidence at this time. Hope this helps Last edited by lauver; at AM. Maybe I can help shed a little light on one of the codes. I have a round head ratchet marked VL, and it came in a set I bought in Hope this helps. All times are GMT The time now is AM. User Name. Remember Me? Page 1 of Thread Tools. Send a private message to lauver.

Find More Posts by lauver. We need to sticky this. Send a private message to littlekillertoad. Find More Posts by littlekillertoad. Find More Posts by porphyre. Send a private message to hofferwood.

Find More Posts by hofferwood. Send a private message to kc-steve. Find More Posts by kc-steve. What y'all think? Send a private message to thesilverone. The next several figures show examples of modern raised-panel wrenches marked with a "P-Circle" manufacturer's code, rather than the more common "V" code. We believe that these examples are highly significant, as they prove that Sears had contracted with multiple makers in the early part of the modern era, before selecting "Maker V" as the primary contractor.

The "P-Circle" mark is the manufacturer's code for Wilde Tools, a maker known today primarily for their pliers, but a full-line tool maker in the s and s. Examples of their production can be seen in our article on Wilde Tools.

The reverse is also marked with an "N4" code and a P-Circle mark forged into the shank. The overall length is 8. The reverse is also marked with an "E3" code and a P-Circle mark forged into the shank. The forged-in "V" code on the shank was soon replaced by a stamped code on the wrench panel, as the next example illustrates. The wrench is stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on raised panel, with "Forged in U. The reverse faces are stamped with the fractional sizes. The use of the "V" code with the Craftsman underline logo suggests that this is early production by Moore Drop Forging, or possibly a transitional form before the tappet wrench markings were updated to the double-line logo.

Later tappet wrenches weren't made with raised panels, so they continued to use the older face marking.

Early Craftsman Series (generally pre, some exceptions): BC = unknown U.S. manufacturer, ca.? -? BE = New Britain and some. Introduced in , Sear's Craftsman line of tools became arguably the most 1/2?, and 3/4? drive sizes, as well a nice assortment of wrenches and other. Some really good manufacturers have made Craftsman,many were top shelf Welcome to the Craftsman Tool Manufacturer and Date Range.

We have an extensive collection of Craftsman "V" series sockets and drive tools and will be adding them to this section, as time permits.

Note that the markings are oriented upside-down relative to later production. The shank also has a forged-in "B" code near the head. In the Craftsman ratchet line adopted a distinctive V-shaped shift lever, based on a design described by patent D,issued to R. The ratchet head is fitted with an oil hole closed by a steel ball, as can be seen in the middle inset. Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent D,issued to R.

In Sears began offering Craftsman ratchets with a convenient quick-release button, based on a design described by patent 3,filed by P. Roberts in and issued in The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Pat. The patent notice refers to patent 3,filed by P. This is the classic patent for the quick-release mechanism. In the late s Sears began offering Craftsman ratchets with a dual-pawl mechanism for ultra fine action, combined with a quick-release button for extra convenience.

These ratchets were based on patents 3, and 3,issued to H.

Haznar in and respectively, and assigned to the Moore Drop Forging Company. The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Patent Pending" notice. The pending status refers to patents 3, and 3,issued to H. Haznar in and respectively, with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company. These examples provide evidence that Craftsman model number markings were added in the time frame. The reverse panel is also stamped with "U.

Patented " patent notices. The first patent 3, was filed by H.

May 2, - Craftsman V-Series and other tools from onward. Pliers and Cutters; Adjustable Wrenches; Chisels and Punches; Specialty Tools. Craftsman wrench dating - Join the leader in relations services and find a date today. Join and search! How to get a good man. It is not easy for women to find a. Last Updated: 11/13/15 (Note-- items in red are the latest updates) Early Craftsman Series (generally pre, some exceptions): A-circle  Craftsman "V" series question.

Haznar in and issued inwith assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company. The describes a pawl-reversing mechanism for fine-tooth ratchets.

SK X-Frame Ratcheting Wrench Set: Unboxing & Initial Impressions

The second patent 3, was filed by H. Haznar in and issued inagain with assignment to the Moore Drop Forging Company. This patent describes a quick-release mechanism adapted to fine-tooth ratchets. The reverse panel is also stamped with a "Patent Pending" patent notice. As Craftsman tools entered the modern era, Sears adopted the "Nested Diamonds" pattern as their standard gripping pattern for pliers.

This appears to have been an active decision on Sears' part, as even Wilde was forced to switch from their preferred and distinctive "Rope Banded" pattern to the Nested Diamonds pattern. By though Sears had relented, and Wilde production switched back to their traditional "Rope Banded" pattern. No manufacturer's code was found on these pliers. The finish is polished steel with no plating, which together with the double-line logo suggests a manufacturing date around The handle pattern closely resembles the "Nested Diamonds" pattern found on many Craftsman Vanadium pliers.

See our article on Early Craftsman Pliers for examples. The design of the pliers resembles the Wilde Wrench Pliers shown on another page. The overall length is 7. Note that the rivet is flush with the surface on the cutting side, allowing the pliers to cut close to a surface.

A review of the Craftsman catalogs found that the pliers were first listed in under the Dunlap brand, and then offered in under the Craftsman brand. The pliers remained available at least throughthe current limit of our catalogs. The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the handle, with "Forged in U. The adjustment mechanism uses a tabbed pivot post operating in slotted holes.

Dating craftsman wrenches

To change the setting, the handles are opened wide to align the tabs with the slots, allowing the handles to be separated and then reinserted in the desired hole. Other tools with the N-Square manufacturer's code include punches and chisels, but the manufacturer associated with the code is not yet known.

Currently our only catalog reference for these pliers is the Craftsman tools catalog. The catalog notes the advantage of the adjustment mechanism in preventing accidental changes of the setting. The upper inset shows the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles, which remained in use at least through the early s.

These pliers are copies of the more familiar Wilde Battery Pliersbut were made with slightly different production and marking characteristics. Note that the parting line from the forging is visible through the impressed handle pattern.

Model battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed in the Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the catalog. Note though that the model number marking on these pliers is unusual for this era. The Wilde Tool Company was the dominant supplier of pliers for the Craftsman brand in the post-war era. Wilde production can be generally be recognized by the rope-banded gripping pattern on the handles, and by a P-Circle manufacturer's code stamped on or forged into the tools.

In this section we'll look at examples of Craftsman pliers presumed to be contract production by Wilde, including many examples with rope-banded patterns on the handles. Additional information on Wilde can be found in our article on the Wilde Tool Company. Battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed as model in the Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the catalog. The pliers are also marked with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles not shown.

The pliers are marked with the Craftsman double-line logo, but no model number is marked. Model numbers were generally marked on Craftsman tools after the late s to early 70s, so these pliers were probably made in the s. The next several figures show examples of Craftsman "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers. The tongue-and-groove design dates back to the classic patent 1, by the Champion De Arment now Channellock company.

This patent expired in the early s, paving the way for competitors to make use of the design. Sears first offered "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers in the Craftsman catalog, and the rear cover illustrates Craftsman "Arc-Joint" pliers with the P-Circle code visible. The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a P-Circle logo below.

The stamped P-Circle code identifies the maker as Wilde, and the unusual for Wilde use of the geometric gripping pattern suggests transitional production.

The Craftsman tool catalog illustrations show that this "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern remained in use on some pliers into the s, but the tongue-and-groove models had switched to the rope-banded pattern by The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles. The forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles represents the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde.

By the Craftsman tool catalogs had illustrations of these tongue-and-groove pliers with the rope-banded gripping pattern. The underside of the handles is also marked with a forged-in "P" code see left insetrepresenting the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde. The rope-banded gripping pattern the long-standing "house pattern" for Wilde was used for Arc-Joint pliers after The lack of a model number marking suggests production before or so.

The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles, representing the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde.

The J. Danielson Company produced pliers for the Fulton, Merit, and Dunlap brands during the s, and later produced at least some models for the Craftsman brand.

Additional information can be found in our article on the J. Danielson Company.

The handle also has a forged-in code "C35" faintly visible on the shoulder. The jaws of the pliers have a drilled recess and milled grooves to hold the ends of a hose-clamp spring see middle insetadding another useful feature to these otherwise conventional combination pliers.

The handles of these pliers have a double-chevron gripping pattern, similar to the older Herringbone pattern used by Danielson for a number of years. An example of this pattern on Proto production can be seen as the Proto Combination Pliers. The forged-in "C35" is a Danielson date code probably indicates production inalthough a later decade may be possible.

In the post-war years Craftsman adjustable wrenches were supplied by J. Williams and by other makers not yet identified. The next figure shows an example of a series of adjustable wrenches offered during the s, notable for the distinctive placement of the hanging hole in the interior of the shank, rather than at the extreme end.

The head thickness was measured at 0. Note that the hanging hole is located in the interior of the depressed panel, rather than at the extreme end. The wrench has a bright plated finish that resembles zinc, and the finish is soft enough to leave a mark on paper.

We hope to be able to identify the manufacturer behind the Y-Circle code in the near future. One construction detail noted is that the screw pin is threaded on the outside slotted end, the type of pin generally used by Danielson and Utica. In contrast, Crescent and Diamond used a screw pin threaded on the inside end.

The next several figures show examples of Williams adjustable wrenches produced for the Craftsman brand. The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the square shoulder used for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder is a feature patented by J. Williams in the s see patent 2, and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers. The patent notice refers to patent 2,filed by W.

Johnson in and issued in This patent describes a locking mechanism for adjustable wrenches, actuated by pushing a locking pin visible in the photograph through the thumb knurl. The reverse shank also shows a forged-in code "L" next to the hole. The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, and a close look shows the square shoulder for the sliding jaw and keyway.

The square shoulder was a patented feature of the J. Williams adjustable wrenches, and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

Fulton or Fulton Tool Company. The comments below dating craftsman wrenches have not been moderated. May 17, - Craftsman Box-End Wrenches .. use of this estimated beginning point in attempting to refine the manufacturing date estimates for some tools. Get the best deal for Craftsman Hand Wrenches from the largest online selection at finishthetrail.com Craftsman wrench dating - Mediazione Linguistica Perugia.

This wrench can be identified as Williams' production by the square-shouldered keyway, and the stamped "JW" code further confirms the maker. The forged-in "L" code has also been observed on J.

This particular wrench is believed to have been purchased new in the late s to early s, a time before Craftsman began marking model numbers on its tools. The next figure shows a similar wrench with a Craftsman model number. The shank is stamped "Forged" on the front with "Made in U.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, with the square shoulder visible on the sliding jaw and keyway. The manufacturer associated with the "N-Square" code is not yet known. This code has also been noted on a Dunlap Punch shown in another article.

The overall length of the handle is The finish is chrome plating. The patent notice refers to patent 2,filed by R. Vose in and issued inwith assignment to Moore Drop Forging. A close comparison with the Williams No.

The small forged-in "T" code to the left of the panel is one of several forge codes used by Williams the others include B, II, O, and V and is not interpreted as a Craftsman manufacturer's code. The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code in a circular depression on the inside of the handles.

The rope-banded handles and P-Circle code indicate production by Wilde. The body is stamped "Made U. The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. Ratcheting box wrenches in this design were listed in the Craftsman tool catalogs as early as Sears continued to use the Dunlap brand for economy tools into the early s, but by the Craftsman catalog no longer included Dunlap tools.

The front panel also has a forged-in code "X" at the left and "LC" at the right end, seen as a close-up in the middle inset. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank after the offset.

The forged-in "LC" code is believed to represent "Lectrolite Corporation". The front panel also has a forged-in code "T" at the left and "LC" at the right, shown as a close-up in the middle inset.

Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank at the junction with the box end.

The shank is also marked with a forged-in Y-Circle logo, visible at the right near the hanging hole. The forged-in Y-Circle logo is believed to be the manufacturer's code, but the maker has not yet been identified. In more recent years Sears has used its own name for a line of economy tools, similar to the Dunlap tools of earlier years.

The Japanese maker associated with the "BF" code has not yet been identified. The "BF" code can also be found on Craftsman wrenches, often with a marking for molybdenum alloy steel. Introduction In an earlier article we reviewed the Early Craftsman Tools of the late s through mid s, and a separate article covered the Craftsman "BE" and H-Circle line of sockets in greater depth. Origins of The Modern Style By the early s the Craftsman brand was about 15 years old and had become highly successful.

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