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  • 16.01.2019
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Author Carole Radziwill Talks New Book, ‘The Widow’s Guide To Sex And Dating’ – CBS Los Angeles

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If you are looking for the perfect fast- paced, lighthearted, humorous novel, consider your search to be over. Radziwill's novel is the perfect book for your solo reading or your next book club. The title is tongue-in-cheek, so you won't find yourself delving into deep grief issues. Instead, you will be carving out time to lose yourself in this splendid novel. Humor permeates Radziwill's writing, and the dialogue is flawless. The reader is quickly drawn Claire's cluttered life. Clare was married to Charles Bryne, a sexologist and well-known author.

Claire Brynes has no depth, she never seems like a grieving widow, only a very shallow socialite who is more concerned with maintaining a social status and landing a new wealthy husband so she can continue to basically do and be nothing. Her friends are just like her, nobody feels like a real person, the situations they are in are not relatable and the dialogue feels very forced.

I will continue to indulge in Real Housewives episodes but perhaps this will be the last book I read by a Real Housewife. I received a free copy of this book from First Reads in exchange for a fair review After Claire's husband is abruptly killed by a priceless piece of art she not only has to readjust to life on her own, but she also has to cope with all the implications and stigmatisations of being classed as a widow.

The Widow’s Guide to Sex and Dating

The married women in her social circle suddenly see her as a husband seducing vixen so they attempt to eliminate the competition by setting her up with all sorts of inappropriate but available men.

And as the weeks pass by and Claire endures one disastrous date after another, she After Claire's husband is abruptly killed by a priceless piece of art she not only has to readjust to life on her own, but she also has to cope with all the implications and stigmatisations of being classed as a widow. And as the weeks pass by and Claire endures one disastrous date after another, she feels the increasing pressure of losing her widowed virginity.

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating started off very quirky and interesting but it quickly went downhill after that. My main issue with the novel, and particularly main character Claire, is that despite the tragic accident that sets up the story there is very little to be found within the pages that showed she is grieving for her late husband.

As a sexologist in life he had a unique approach to their marriage, claiming that relationships are either sex or love but never the two together, yet despite his ideas on the matter she seemed to care deeply for him so it is peculiar that almost as soon as he passed away she felt the need to move on to someone else.

Her slew of therapists and gurus makes me believe she has a real issue making any decisions for herself, so perhaps the fruitless attempts at replacing her husband so swiftly had more to do with her own fears of being alone rather than a lack of compassion for the man she was married to.

Nonetheless, the easy way with which she seemed to dismiss her late husband and her marriage made her come across egoistical rather than sympathetic and made it very hard to care for her and her struggles. What also made it rather difficult to get stuck in to this book is that it was hard to classify.

At times it read like a chick-lit, at others as erotica and there were even hints of an old-fashioned detective buried underneath. However, because it is all over the place it ended up being none of the above. The novel would've benefitted from author Carole Radziwill choosing one genre to focus on, as well as more of a plot than "a new widow goes through a series of dates". In all it certainly wasn't quite so terrible that I didn't finish it, but I did struggle with the increasingly bland storyline until I was relieved when I turned the last page.

Dec 22, Michelle rated it liked it Shelves: books-i-own, fictionfirstreads. It was a quick read, and definitely strikes me as the kind of novel that would be ideal to pick up in an airport bookstore.

Basically, Claire Byrne's husband, Charlie, dies at the beginning of the novel, the casualty of a fake Giacometti sculpture Why does it need to be a fake?

Because Giacometti has been faked? I never figured that one out. Because it added some depth?

Because it was a quirky detail for a quirky novel filled with quirky characters? Charlie is a sexologist who believes that sex and love cannot coexist within the same relationship whoa, mansplainingso while he "loves" Claire, she's pretty much been there to support him since they married.

Claire abandoned her own work and focused on Charlie, so when he dies, she's left with little other than his unfinished book about Hollywood's sex-icon, Jack Huxley.

So, because Claire has nothing really of her own except for a short story about sex and Woody Allen called "Hustling Woody" that she published long agoshe's the perfect vessel for everyone else's ideas about what a widow should be. She sees two therapists, a psychic, and a botanomanist so that they can tell her what to do. Eventually her friend Sasha convinces her to date, and her husband's publisher convinces her to work on her late husband's book.

I hate this guy, so I should not go on a second date, but maybe see the guy I just dislike again. This book feels a lot like an episode of "Sex and the City," where Miranda is pressured into behaving like Samantha and has to find the happy medium after her husband dies, with the addition of the idea of widowhood as a "new virginity" to lose.

A lot of it was kind of dumb, and incredibly unrelatable for those of us that aren't Manhattan socialites.

Additionally, the author is apparently a "Real Housewife of New York," so I guess she's used to a certain amount of fictionalized reality.

Maybe that's why most of this book doesn't really ring true. Still, it's entertainment, and it's chick lit made quirky and privileged. I would probably recommend to fans of "Housewives" or "Sex and the City" I don't fall into those categories. Mar 19, Diane rated it really liked it. Claire Byrne is married to Charlie, a reknowned sexologist, author of many books on the subject. One day, he is killed by a huge statue falling from a crane on Fifth Avenue in New York. Claire finds herself a widow in her 30s and completely lost as to what to do next.

She goes to two different therapists, visits psychics and even follows a griot, a storyteller who travels the city sharing stories about famous New York City dwellers, to try and find her way to a new life. Then she meets Jack Huxle Claire Byrne is married to Charlie, a reknowned sexologist, author of many books on the subject. Then she meets Jack Huxley, the notoriously heterosexual movie star whom every woman wants, and has some sort of relationship with him.

Throughout the novel, Claire shares the rules she is learning about sex and dating for widows, like Rule "Never discourage anyone who continues to make progress, no matter how slow" Plato Rule A boy says, "Have a good trip", a man says "Call me when you land. Kennedy and his wife Carolyn in a plane crash. It is a brilliant book, and so I was interested to see what her fiction would be like.

This is definitely a book for anyone who loves to immerse themselves in the wealthy NYC culture; those who religiously watch The Real Housewives of New York City will love it and Radziwill is a cast member of that show. Claire is an interesting character, a little snarky, and her journey through widowhood the depression, the setups with widowers forty years older rings true.

She is trying to find her place after being in the shadow of her famous husband, what her friend describes as "Charlie's Sundance to Claire's Butch Cassidy. The best part of the book are the Jack Huxley sections.

Huxley clearly is meant to be George Clooney, and Radziwill dated Clooney years ago, which makes this novel all the more delicious. I'm not sure Clooney will be thrilled though. Fans of Gigi Levangie's books The Starter Wife will like this one; there is the same mix of humor and poignancy.

Mar 29, Alison Diem rated it liked it Shelves: literature, fiction. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really enjoyed the prose in the book, and for the most part, even enjoyed Claire's dating shenanigans. I went in knowing this was big "L" literature, as opposed to a romance novel, so there was no expectation for a happy ending on my part. And because I knew it was literature, it didn't bother me that there wasn't a whole lot happening, in terms of plot.

I found the prose beautiful and the journey interesting, mostly because she wasn't a weepy mess. The loss of her husband wasn't the worst thing I really enjoyed the prose in the book, and for the most part, even enjoyed Claire's dating shenanigans. The loss of her husband wasn't the worst thing that could happen to her, as it has been portrayed in so many other novels, and the soul searching she does to determine just what her husband meant to her is refreshing and different.

I was sad that her relationship with Huxley went nowhere, although we were told that's what would happen from the beginning.

The romance reader in me wondered if this would be the case where Claire was able to change him because of their connection, but no, this wasn't that book. Perhaps for the better. I felt as though Claire was very alone. None of her friends seemed like particularly good friends, and were mostly pretty self-centered themselves. While that might be "real life", it just made me feel even sadder for Claire- she had a horrible husband who she didn't even seem to like that much, let alone love, and then when he's gone, she's left with a bunch of assholes who can't think about much beyond their issues.

I felt like the ending was very tacked on and the author clearly was advised to remind readers of all the clues that she supposedly left about who Claire would end up with. After reading the reminders, I still wasn't impressed with the ending. While I don't think that Huxley was the man for Claire, I almost would have preferred her to be alone but happy with herself than to have this tacked on ending that came out of nowhere.

But, despite those issues, I did feel like the book was an enjoyable read, the prose excellent, the story at times sad, at times funny, and the world one that I wasn't very familiar with but interested none the less.

Apr 22, G. Her need to redefine herself and her need for a man give us endless pages of maudlin musings along with unproductive sessions with two therapists.

Finally, Claire decides on a truly bizarre project. At this point we enter a familiar Aristotelian arc. Claire meets Jack. The flame flickers toward extinction. Happily ever after looms on the horizon. Apr 03, BookPage added it Shelves: toparchive. At 32, Claire Byrne is smart, beautiful and married to famous author and sexologist Charlie Byrne.

Author Carole Radziwill Talks New Book, ‘The Widow’s Guide To Sex And Dating’

Then Charlie is improbably killed by a falling piece of art while walking home from a tryst with his publicist, and Claire finds herself with the burden opportunity? She fumbles through dates set up by well-intentioned girlfriends, drinks a lot of wine, sleeps too much and consults a ridiculous series of questionable therapists.

An award-winning former TV reporter, Radziwill is also the author of the well-received What Remains—a memoir of her marriage, which ended when her husband died of cancer in Jul 09, Helene Barmen rated it it was ok. When I first heard of this novel I thought the idea behind it was great. I have read Carole Radziwill's memoir and seen her on Real Housewives of New York and feel like she has the best starting point possible for writing about widowhood with a little bit of an edge.

Unfortunately, the idea is better than the execution in this case. Claire Byrne very suddenly becomes a widow in her early thirties. She's been married to a somewhat famous writer and when she all of a sudden finds herself alone she When I first heard of this novel I thought the idea behind it was great.

She's been married to a somewhat famous writer and when she all of a sudden finds herself alone she doesn't know what to do. The book explores her way back into the dating scene and her road out of her dead husband's shadow. My main drawback with this book is the main character. I never really care that much what happens to her and I feel like even though Radziwill is trying to say something about love, relationships, mourning and moving on, I never get under Claire's skin and never feel what she's feeling.

The side characters are also pretty shallow and only serve as comic reliefs but most of the time I don't really find them funny. Even though the story and characters are not to my liking, I do like the structure and language of the book.

At the end she wraps up the story with a somewhat surprising ending but what I like the most is how she ties the whole book together with a few great throwbacks at the end. I think Radziwill didn't try to write a profound novel that aims at digging deep into my emotions but I still expected a bit more from her.

She does point to the romantic comedy a few times and the book works well for the same situations as a romantic comedy. I still love Carole and I might give another novel of her's a try. Apr 28, Christine Bass rated it really liked it. After seeing the author on RH and hearing about her other book which gets high praiseI decided I wanted to read this one.

As I started reading, I literally was taken aback at the authors casual use in the beginning chapter or two-not sure which of a certain "C" word! Now, I'm no prude, I did read all 3 50 Shades books but I was, truthfully, a bit disgusted at the use of that "C" word as if it is the usual word to use when referring to a certain female body part.

Her novel The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is a fictional work, but the best personal life and I'm sure this has added intrigue to its sales. The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is a comedy about a widowed young New Yorker who wants to recapture the type of love she never had. The Paperback of the The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill at Barnes & Noble. Sales rank: , Product.

So when I titled my review After seeing the author on RH and hearing about her other book which gets high praiseI decided I wanted to read this one. So when I titled my review as "She almost lost me I read on and was happy to see that word was not thrown around so flippantly again although it was used one more time in the book in, to me, a more appropriate manner and setting in which the use of that "C" word was at least understandable!

I won't bore you with a synopsis, as I am sure you know the premise: husbands dies suddenly, young wife now a young widow, tries to find her new "real" identity through a series of step and missteps.

I do want to say that after my initial shock see aboveI am happy I read on as I enjoyed the story and did enjoy the authors style, as well. It is a good read for the summer, but I would not recommend it to any man. It is definitely a book written by a woman geared for women! Sep 30, Megan rated it liked it Shelves: funny-humor-satireother-giveawaysarcs-non-firstreads-giveawayscontemporaryamerican-storiesromance.

Earlier this summer, I won a mystery box of books from a local NYT best-selling author. Included in that box was a copy of this book. However, when I discovered that the author was one of the Real Housewives of New York, it all became clear -- the author who sent me the box of books is a huge fan of the show.

Mystery solved! Given the title and blurb on the jacket, I was expecting something a little racier and less relatable, but was happy to discover that it didn't meet my preconceived notions. While I didn't necessarily relate to the main character's lifestyle, I found her to be more down-to-earth than I would have expected and liked spending time in her world.

I enjoyed the writing style and elements of humor sprinkled throughout. When I picked this one up, I was looking for some lighter escapism and this checked the box. Even though the ending wasn't a surprise, I liked the fact it had a happy ending, which was just what I needed. Mar 11, Susan rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. I gotta say I enjoyed this book. When we go through a major life change - marriage, becoming a mother, death of a close loved one, divorce, we all go through a shaky period to find out who we are in light of these changes.

On Sale: 10/20/ The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker. “The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel,” is a smart and funny satire about loss, libido and true love. Claire is a young widow and the. Claire Byrne comes piteously undone after Charlie, her imperious husband and a best-selling sexologist, is beaned by a knockoff pound.

And not all of us are as fast and successful at reinventing ourselves as Madonna. Claire has identified with being merely Charlie's wife and although she was not ecstatically happy with that label, she was content. When she was forced to come to terms with who she was and what I gotta say I enjoyed this book. When she was forced to come to terms with who she was and what she wanted, there were some bumps in the road. And naturally she had an affair with the man her husband had all but picked out for her.

But in the end, she does make her own choices, write her own book and live in her own way even if she does end up with another man. Not sure if her choice of Ben was a final breaking away from her dead husband or a lasting thing - but I felt there was some closure.

The writing was witty and elegant. Sort of reminded me of Sex and the City book not tv show only slower paced, less choppy and more refined. May 27, Erika rated it liked it. I'm generous in my rating, to say the least. This book is like reading a page long People magazine. People is a fun magazine, but it is not a novel. The book is entertaining, but that is much as I can give it. Every stereotype in the world--from having a crazy, brazen, bold best friend who tries to pull the boring, stay at home character to go out at nightto the gay best friend who tells it like it is, to the stodgy boss, they are all here!

Every character is what a NYC character "should I'm generous in my rating, to say the least. Every character is what a NYC character "should" be, including the shrinks, the psychics, even the newsstand guy. There is way too much name-dropping, not only of who is in restaurants or at parties, but name-dropping of artists and philosophers as well Of course, you want to see if the widow will find love, but the unrealistic paths she takes to get there are almost unbelievable.

If you have nothing else on your reading pile, this would be fine, but there are so many GOOD books out there!

The widows guide to sex and dating sales

Why bother? After reading many reviews, I feel it's necessary for me to chime in. Many reviewers seem to have come to this book thinking they know the author from her memoir or from her appearances on The Real Housewives. Really we should all be coming at this as a first time book by an unknown author. Bringing preconceived notions happens all the time, but to post a review and not reference any possible bias is unfair. In general I liked the book and am glad I finished it.

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I thought the ending was rushed an After reading many reviews, I feel it's necessary for me to chime in. I found the main character of Claire, to be a lost soul, and was glad she was getting a second chance to possibly have a great life.

I also was able to tell that Ms. Radziwill took time with her choice of every word and phrase; there was practically nothing trite in her descriptions or jokes. And who references Iberian ham in a simile?!

Great one! Read this book for what it is, a fun first novel by an articulate woman. May 12, Eva Thieme rated it liked it. This was a quick and pleasant read and therefore fulfilled the purpose I'd picked it up at the library for, but nothing more.

I liked it, but I wouldn't say it's a must-read book, and neither am I rushing out to find more by this author. The main character, Claire, is lovable, you root for her to, well, finally have sex again after her husband unexpecte This was a quick and pleasant read and therefore fulfilled the purpose I'd picked it up at the library for, but nothing more. The main character, Claire, is lovable, you root for her to, well, finally have sex again after her husband unexpectedly passes away, and there is quite a bit of satire in it, but not nearly at the level of a Tom Wolfe novel.

Much more benign and therefore not nearly as depressing, but it's there, a recurrent critique of the upper crust and their extravagant lifestyle. But I just couldn't say I "really" liked it. Feb 24, Melissa rated it it was ok Shelves: widow-s-book-corneraudiobook. I'm sorry it's mean to say but if you have a bad voice, you have no business reading books. Feb 19, Jay rated it really liked it. If you enjoy sarcastic, irreverent, black humour, chances are you'll enjoy Widow's Guide.

While Carole more than proved her talent as a writer with 'What Remains' I liked this book because although it is a novel, I feel as though there were places where she was able to infuse the book with a realism that is often lacking in other novels of a similar genre. Perhaps this was her version of therapy2. What sets Carole's writing apart is that she has the abil If you enjoy sarcastic, irreverent, black humour, chances are you'll enjoy Widow's Guide.

What sets Carole's writing apart is that she has the ability to use her wit and dark humour while keeping the heavier emotions in place as well. No easy task for any writer, yet she's mastered it. If you're hoping for anything like What Remains, you'll be disappointed. Not only is she super successful in her own right, but she is an actual princess and distantly related to the Kennedy family. This means that Carole has to be pretty rich. I always wondered why she has the most laid back personality out of all the New York City Housewives, but it's probably because she's worry free thanks to her fortune.

Carole Radziwill's net worth is pretty typical Carole, but it's still pretty mindblowing. And I don't know about you, but this is pretty shocking considering that she's a grown women who had the kitchen removed from her apartment, but if that's true, it means that she has the highest net worth out of all the New York Housewives. How did she get to this point though? So how successful is she? Carole has the distinction of being on the New York Times Bestseller list.

Her novel The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is a fictional work, but the best art is inspired by real life, so the fans have been reading it trying to link it to Carole's interesting personal life and I'm sure this has added intrigue to its sales.

Carole Radziwill's debut novel, The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating earns five out of five stars. Radziwill's novel is the perfect book for your. The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker hell-bent on recapturing a . In Carole Radziwill's new novel, “The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating,” the main character, a woman whose husband died five months earlier.

It seems to me that the combination of her writing ability, intriguing personal life, and Real Housewives fame means that her books will continue to sell and make her even more money. Carole worked her way up to be a respected journalist.

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel [Carole Radziwill] on Amazon. com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Radziwill's delicious debut novel is a.

From there she worked as a news anchor for ABC. She won several awards for her work including several Emmy's and a Peabody award. It's very clear that Radzi was a hard worker and very successful at her job so I am sure that once she starting racking in those accolades that her pay increased. Carole was married to Prince Anthony Radziwill before his untimely death from cancer. This marriage means that Radzi is actually a Polish princess and this probably means that she is pretty well taken care of.

And on top of being actual royalty, this marriage makes Carole a distant relative of America's royal family, The Kennedys. It's safe to assume that these royal connections have contributed to the reality star's net worth.

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